Friday, November 17, 2006

Media

Los Angeles TV News (UPN 13) 2001: news coverage of the release of the unlockable TitleWave software library on a CD on the front cover of Family PC Magazine.
View the video

ABC National Radio (Australia Wide) 1992: Radio Interview by one of Australia's top technology journalists with Ric Richardson discussing the implications and background of the Uniloc technology.
Audio coming soon....

ABCTV National News story (1993): Television news story about IBM signing deal to represent Uniloc globally.
Video coming soon...

More coming soon.

Strengths

The following report was provided as part of a report generated and copyright © 2000 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Clifton StrengthsFinder ® and each of the 34 Clifton StrengthsFinder theme names are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.

Top Five Report for Ric B Richardson

Ideation
You are fascinated by ideas. What is an idea? An idea is a concept, the best explanation of the most events. You are delighted when you discover beneath the complex surface an elegantly simple concept to explain why things are the way they are. An idea is a connection. Yours is the kind of mind that is always looking for connections, and so you are intrigued when seemingly disparate phenomena can be linked by an obscure connection. An idea is a new perspective on familiar challenges. You revel in taking the world we all know and turning it around so we can view it from a strange but strangely enlightening angle. You love all these ideas because they are profound, because they are novel, because they are clarifying, because they are contrary, because they are bizarre. For all these reasons you derive a jolt of energy whenever a new idea occurs to you. Others may label you creative or original or conceptual or even smart. Perhaps you are all of these. Who can be sure? What you are sure of is that ideas are thrilling. And on most days this is enough.

Ideation Sounds like this: Mark B., writer: "My mind works by finding connections between things. The other day I was hunting down the Mona Lisa in the Louvre museum. I turned a corner and was blinded by the flashing of a thousand cameras snapping the tiny picture. For some reason I stored that visual image away. Then I noticed a NO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY sign, and I stored that away, too. I thought it was odd because I remembered reading that flash photography can harm paintings. Then about six months later I read that the Mona Lisa has been stolen at least twice in this century. And suddenly I put it all together. The only explanation for all these facts is that the real Mona Lisa is not on display in the Louvre. The real Mona Lisa has been stolen, and the museum, afraid to admit their carelessness, has installed a fake. I don't know if it's true, of course, but what a great story." Andrea H., interior designer: "I have the kind of mind where everything has to fit together or I start to feel very odd. For me, every piece of furniture represents an idea. It serves a discrete function both independently and in concert with every other piece. The 'idea' of each piece is so powerful in mind, it must be obeyed. If I am sitting in a room where the chairs are somehow not fulfilling their discrete function-they're the wrong kind of chairs or they're facing the wrong way or they're pushed up too close to the coffee table-I find myself getting physically uncomfortable and mentally distracted. Later, I won't be able to get it out of my mind. I'll find myself awake at 3:00 a.m."

Focus
"Where am I headed?" you ask yourself. You ask this question every day. Guided by this theme of Focus, you need a clear destination. Lacking one, your life and your work can quickly become frustrating. And so each year, each month, and even each week you set goals. These goals then serve as your compass, helping you determine priorities and make the necessary corrections to get back on course. Your Focus is powerful because it forces you to filter; you instinctively evaluate whether or not a particular action will help you move toward your goal. Those that don't are ignored. In the end, then, your Focus forces you to be efficient. Naturally, the flip side of this is that it causes you to become impatient with delays, obstacles, and even tangents, no matter how intriguing they appear to be. This makes you an extremely valuable team member. When others start to wander down other avenues, you bring them back to the main road. Your Focus reminds everyone that if something is not helping you move toward your destination, then it is not important. And if it is not important, then it is not worth your time. You keep everyone on point.

Focus Sounds like this:
Nick H., computer executive: "It is very important to me to be efficient. I'm the sort of guy who plays a round of golf in two and a half hours. When I was at Electronic Data Systems, I worked out a set list of questions so that I could conduct a review of each division in 15 minutes. The founder, Ross Perot, called me 'The Dentist' because I would schedule a whole day of these in-and-out, fifteen-minute meetings." Brad F., sales executive: "I am always sorting priorities, trying to figure out the most efficient route toward the goal so that there is very little dead time, very little wasted motion. For example, I will get multiple calls from customers who need me to call the service department for them, and rather than taking each one of these calls as they come and interrupting the priorities of the day, I group them together into one call at the end of the day and get it done." Mike L., administrator: "People are amazed how I put things into perspective and stay on track. When people around the district are stuck on issues and caught on contrived barriers, I am able to pole-vault over them, reestablish the focus, and keep things moving." Doriane L., homemaker: "I am just the kind of person who likes to get to the point-in conversations, at work, and even when I am shopping with my husband. He likes to try on lots of things and has a good time doing it, whereas I try one thing on, and if I like it and it is not horribly priced, I buy it. I'm a surgical shopper."

Learner
You love to learn. The subject matter that interests you most will be determined by your other themes and experiences, but whatever the subject, you will always be drawn to the process of learning. The process, more than the content or the result, is especially exciting for you. You are energized by the steady and deliberate journey from ignorance to competence. The thrill of the first few facts, the early efforts to recite or practice what you have learned, the growing confidence of a skill mastered-this is the process that entices you. Your excitement leads you to engage in adult learning experiences-yoga or piano lessons or graduate classes. It enables you to thrive in dynamic work environments where you are asked to take on short project assignments and are expected to learn a lot about the new subject matter in a short period of time and then move on to the next one. This Learner theme does not necessarily mean that you seek to become the subject matter expert, or that you are striving for the respect that accompanies a professional or academic credential. The outcome of the learning is less significant than the "getting there."

Learner Sounds like this:
Annie M., managing editor: "I get antsy when I am not learning something. Last year, although I was enjoying my work, I didn't feel as though I was learning enough. So I took up tap dancing. It sounds strange, doesn't it? I know I am never going to perform or anything, but I enjoy focusing on the technical skill of tapping, getting a little better each week, and moving up from the beginners' class to the intermediate class. That was a kick." Miles A., operations manager: "When I was seven years old, my teachers would tell my parents, 'Miles isn't the most intelligent boy in the school, but he's a sponge for learning and he'll probably go really far because he will push himself and continually be grasping new things.' Right now I am just starting a course in business-travel Spanish. I know it is probably too ambitious to think I could learn conversational Spanish and become totally proficient in that language, but I at least want to be able to travel there and know the language." Tim S., coach for executives: "One of my clients is so inquisitive that it drives him crazy because he can't do everything he wants to. I'm different. I am not curious in that broad sense. I prefer to go into greater depth with things so that I can become competent in them and then use them at work. For example, recently one of my clients wanted me to travel with him to Nice, France, for a business engagement, so I started reading up on the region, buying books, checking the Internet. It was all interesting and I enjoyed the study, but I wouldn't have done any of it if I wasn't going to be traveling there for work."

Strategic
The Strategic theme enables you to sort through the clutter and find the best route. It is not a skill that can be taught. It is a distinct way of thinking, a special perspective on the world at large. This perspective allows you to see patterns where others simply see complexity. Mindful of these patterns, you play out alternative scenarios, always asking, "What if this happened? Okay, well what if this happened?" This recurring question helps you see around the next corner. There you can evaluate accurately the potential obstacles. Guided by where you see each path leading, you start to make selections. You discard the paths that lead nowhere. You discard the paths that lead straight into resistance. You discard the paths that lead into a fog of confusion. You cull and make selections until you arrive at the chosen path-your strategy. Armed with your strategy, you strike forward. This is your Strategic theme at work: "What if?" Select. Strike.

Strategic Sounds like this:
Liam C., manufacturing plant manager: "It seems as if I can always see the consequences before anyone else can. I have to say to people, 'Lift up your eyes, look down the road a ways. Let's talk about where we are going to be next year so that when we get to this time next year, we don't have the same problems.' It seems obvious to me, but some people are just too focused on this month's numbers, and everything is driven by that." Vivian T., television producer: "I used to love logic problems when I was a kid. You know, the ones where 'if A implies B, and B equals C, does A equal C?' Still today I am always playing out repercussions, seeing where things lead. I think it makes me a great interviewer. I know that nothing is an accident; every sign, every word, every tone of voice has significance. So I watch for these clues and play them out in my head, see where they lead, and then plan my questions to take advantage of what I have seen in my head." Simon T., human resources executive: "We really needed to take the union on at some stage, and I saw an opportunity, a very good issue to take them on. I could see that they were going in a direction that would lead them into all kinds of trouble if they continued down it. Lo and behold, they did continue down it, and when they arrived, there I was, ready and waiting. I suppose it just comes naturally to me to predict what someone else is going to do. And then when that person reacts, I can respond immediately because I have sat down and said, 'Okay, if they do this, we'll do this. If they do that, then we'll do this other thing.' It's like when you tack in a sailboat. You head in one direction, but you jink one way, then another, planning and reacting, planning and reacting."

Self-Assurance
Self-Assurance is similar to self-confidence. In the deepest part of you, you have faith in your strengths. You know that you are able-able to take risks, able to meet new challenges, able to stake claims, and, most important, able to deliver. But Self-Assurance is more than just self-confidence. Blessed with the theme of Self-Assurance, you have confidence not only in your abilities but in your judgment. When you look at the world, you know that your perspective is unique and distinct. And because no one sees exactly what you see, you know that no one can make your decisions for you. No one can tell you what to think. They can guide. They can suggest. But you alone have the authority to form conclusions, make decisions, and act. This authority, this final accountability for the living of your life, does not intimidate you. On the contrary, it feels natural to you. No matter what the situation, you seem to know what the right decision is. This theme lends you an aura of certainty. Unlike many, you are not easily swayed by someone else's arguments, no matter how persuasive they may be. This Self-Assurance may be quiet or loud, depending on your other themes, but it is solid. It is strong. Like the keel of a ship, it withstands many different pressures and keeps you on your course.

Self-Assurance Sounds like this:
Pam D., public service executive: "I was raised on a remote farm in Idaho, and I attended a small rural school. One day I returned home from school and announced to my mother that I was changing schools. Earlier in the day my teacher had explained that our school had too many kids and that three kids would have to move to a different school. I thought about it for a moment, liked the idea of meeting new people, and decided I would be one of them-even though it meant getting up half an hour earlier and traveling further on the bus. I was five years old." James K., salesman: "I never second-guess myself. Whether I am buying a birthday present or a house, when I make my decision, it feels to me as if I had no choice. There was only one decision to make, and I made it. It's easy for me to sleep at night. My gut is final, loud, and very persuasive." Deborah C., ER nurse: "If we have a death in the ER, people call on me to deal with the family because of my confidence. Just yesterday we had a problem with a young psychotic girl who was screaming that the devil was inside her. The other nurses were afraid, but I knew what to do. I went in and said, 'Kate, come on, lie back. Let's say the Baruch. It's a Jewish prayer. It goes like this: Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech Haolam.' She responded, 'Say it slowly so that I can say it back to you.' I did and then she said it back to me slowly. She wasn't Jewish, but this calm came over her. She dropped back against her pillow and said, 'Thank you. That's all I needed.' "


Brief Descriptions of the 34 Themes of Talent Measured by the Clifton StrengthsFinder

Achiever
People strong in the Achiever theme have a great deal of stamina and work hard. They take great satisfaction from being busy and productive.

Activator
People strong in the Activator theme can make things happen by turning thoughts into action. They are often impatient.

Adaptability
People strong in the Adaptability theme prefer to "go with the flow." They tend to be "now" people who take things as they come and discover the future one day at a time.

Analytical
People strong in the Analytical theme search for reasons and causes. They have the ability to think about all the factors that might affect a situation.

Arranger
People strong in the Arranger theme can organize, but they also have a flexibility that complements this ability. They like to figure out how all of the pieces and resources can be arranged for maximum productivity.

Belief
People strong in the Belief theme have certain core values that are unchanging. Out of these values emerges a defined purpose for their life.

Command
People strong in the Command theme have presence. They can take control of a situation and make decisions.

Communication
People strong in the Communication theme generally find it easy to put their thoughts into words. They are good conversationalists and presenters.

Competition
People strong in the Competition theme measure their progress against the performance of others. They strive to win first place and revel in contests.

Connectedness
People strong in the Connectedness theme have faith in the links between all things. They believe there are few coincidences and that almost every event has a reason.

Consistency
People strong in the Consistency theme are keenly aware of the need to treat people the same. They try to treat everyone in the world with consistency by setting up clear rules and adhering to them.

Context
People strong in the Context theme enjoy thinking about the past. They understand the present by researching its history.

Deliberative
People strong in the Deliberative theme are best described by the serious care they take in making decisions or choices. They anticipate the obstacles.

Developer
People strong in the Developer theme recognize and cultivate the potential in others. They spot the signs of each small improvement and derive satisfaction from these improvements.

Discipline
People strong in the Discipline theme enjoy routine and structure. Their world is best described by the order they create.

Empathy
People strong in the Empathy theme can sense the feelings of other people by imagining themselves in others' lives or others' situations.

Focus
People strong in the Focus theme can take a direction, follow through, and make the corrections necessary to stay on track. They prioritize, then act.

Futuristic
People strong in the Futuristic theme are inspired by the future and what could be. They inspire others with their visions of the future.

Harmony
People strong in the Harmony theme look for consensus. They don't enjoy conflict; rather, they seek areas of agreement.

Ideation
People strong in the Ideation theme are fascinated by ideas. They are able to find connections between seemingly disparate phenomena.

Includer
People strong in the Includer theme are accepting of others. They show awareness of those who feel left out, and make an effort to include them.

Individualization
People strong in the Individualization theme are intrigued with the unique qualities of each person. They have a gift for figuring out how people who are different can work together productively.

Input
People strong in the Input theme have a craving to know more. Often they like to collect and archive all kinds of information.

Intellection
People strong in the Intellection theme are characterized by their intellectual activity. They are introspective and appreciate intellectual discussions.

Learner
People strong in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them.

Maximizer
People strong in the Maximizer theme focus on strengths as a way to stimulate personal and group excellence. They seek to transform something strong into something superb.

Positivity
People strong in the Positivity theme have an enthusiasm that is contagious. They are upbeat and can get others excited about what they are going to do.

Relator
People who are strong in the Relator theme enjoy close relationships with others. They find deep satisfaction in working hard with friends to achieve a goal.

Responsibility
People strong in the Responsibility theme take psychological ownership of what they say they will do. They are committed to stable values such as honesty and loyalty.

Restorative
People strong in the Restorative theme are adept at dealing with problems. They are good at figuring out what is wrong and resolving it.

Self-Assurance
People strong in the Self-Assurance theme feel confident in their ability to manage their own lives. They possess an inner compass that gives them confidence that their decisions are right.

Significance
People strong in the Significance theme want to be very important in the eyes of others. They are independent and want to be recognized.

Strategic
People strong in the Strategic theme create alternative ways to proceed. Faced with any given scenario, they can quickly spot the relevant patterns and issues.

Woo
People strong in the Woo theme love the challenge of meeting new people and winning them over. They derive satisfaction from breaking the ice and making a connection with another person.

Media

Los Angeles TV News (UPN 13) 2001: news coverage of the release of the unlockable TitleWave software library on a CD on the front cover of Family PC Magazine.
View the video

ABC National Radio (Australia Wide) 1992: Radio Interview by one of Australia's top technology journalists with Ric Richardson discussing the implications and background of the Uniloc technology.
Audio coming soon....

ABCTV National News story (1993): Television news story about IBM signing deal to represent Uniloc globally.
Video coming soon...

More coming soon.

Quips

About creative thinking...
"The simplest most elegant solutions are frequently dreamed up by the people who most want to avoid the work of doing it the existing way... present company excluded."
Ric Richardson 2006
About perceptions of Inventors...
"Most people who think they know a person who thinks outside the box is only talking about a guy who can move boxes really fast. Speed does not equal novelty, the true basis of invention."
Ric Richardson 2006


About invention...
"If you want someone to think outside the box, then find someone who doesnt know what a box looks like."

Ric Richardson 1992
This quip came from Ric's reaction to explaining why someone from MIT didn't come up with the Uniloc idea first. The fact is that often education limits your scope to solving problems by telling you paths that are not worth investigating, when with a little imagination those paths can be adapted to do completly new things.
About Leadership...
"Leadership is the ability to get people to do things without coercion. Otherwise its just bullying."
Ric Richardson 2006

Quips

About creative thinking...
"The simplest most elegant solutions are frequently dreamed up by the people who most want to avoid the work of doing it the existing way... present company excluded."
Ric Richardson 2006
About perceptions of Inventors...
"Most people who think they know a person who thinks outside the box is only talking about a guy who can move boxes really fast. Speed does not equal novelty, the true basis of invention."
Ric Richardson 2006


About invention...
"If you want someone to think outside the box, then find someone who doesnt know what a box looks like."

Ric Richardson 1992
This quip came from Ric's reaction to explaining why someone from MIT didn't come up with the Uniloc idea first. The fact is that often education limits your scope to solving problems by telling you paths that are not worth investigating, when with a little imagination those paths can be adapted to do completly new things.
About Leadership...
"Leadership is the ability to get people to do things without coercion. Otherwise its just bullying."
Ric Richardson 2006

Patent Listing

US 5,490,216: (The Uniloc Patent) Method for software registration. The underpinning technology for software Activation, Try and Buy and device based authentication for security and privacy applications.
Link to patent


US 6,400,293: (The Logarex Patent) Data compression system and method. A new approach to data compression using cyclical algorithmic calculations.
Link to patent

Other listings coming soon….

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

The 8 week cycle

About two years ago I started reminiscing about my youth and particularly the 6 weeks of vacation that most Aussies of my generation got to enjoy at the end of every year starting mid December and going to the end of January. Surfing in the morning, motorbike riding in the afternoon, camp fire steak and salad, some cards and a really great sleep.

The wonderful thing about this was the way you can really change gears… get out of the rut of the work cycle and get a chance to look at things a-fresh…

These happy thoughts came to me after a particularly intense 6 months at work. This memory combined with a natural awareness of my own biorhythms (self awareness of waves of emotional, mental and physical highs and lows) gave me the impetus to explore a work cycle engineered to have its own peak and lull.

In some ways its similar to the quarterly peak and lull of a corporate calendar, but in this case the cycle is geared towards your own particular cycle, not a companies mandated cycle… over the years I have found that I can concentrate on a project for a maximum effective period of 6 weeks… roughly a week to get up to speed, a month to solve the problem and a week or two to package it up and finalize it. Longer projects need to be broken down and shorter projects can fit around the core cycle projects. Then in the remaining 1 to 2 weeks of the cycle the idea is to change gears… go on holidays or do something different to come back to the next cycle refreshed, energized and ready to go.

The big advantage to this I have found is that it helps you know when to make a big push to make something happen… when you set a 6 week deadline for yourself, you know when to escalate. When to really push if things are not happening… and to know that you don’t have to live with this level of tension and intensity for more than a week or two. This is especially true for my line of work where the deadlines are nearly always artificial and self determined.

In practice the holiday weeks only result in actual time away every two or three cycles (4 or 6 months) but the weeks are still used for slow time or to work on more fun non essential projects. For those two weeks family becomes the priority and having a nice lunch every other day can be a nice reward for a successful cycle and preparation for the next upcoming cycle. The important thing is to change gears, read a book, look into something new. All this makes me want to stop writing this article and start planning my next cycle…

Saturday, November 4, 2006

GUI for the UX... great stuff



The UX is working out wonderfully. The little control app button to the lower right of the UX can be programmed for any app so I cooked up a quick control panel with an exe based flash file that uses callto instructions to invoke skype to call my favorite people.

I am now looking at the merits of other applications but this makes the UX really user friendly, and the customization factor makes it really fun to explore... there is a big future in custom GUIs for UMPCs.

Thursday, November 2, 2006

Picked up a Sony UX280 today... why do people NOT get it?

Today my co founder and I received delivery of two spanking new Sony UX280’s. For most of the office there was definitely an oooooo factor. Oooooo what’s that? Is it a phone? Does it run XP? The screens small…. How can you use that all day? And on and on….. for me the UX is a first test to see if I can migrate up from a cell phone.
The UX represents to me the first time to get the best of all worlds.A phone (with Bluetooth headset and Skype), a cool customizable interface (I’m using flash to write a palm-like GUI) for a few often used tasks and traveling use.. (more later) and finally as my main operations PC (i.e. Outlook comms website passwords and documentation).
The first test was tonight when I video conferenced at full screen with my brother in Australia while sitting in the family room. The optimization of the integrated webcam was spectacular only 1/3rd of a second delay over 11g. My wife grabbed the UX to show my brother the dogs asleep on the couch and then went to her computer to get instructions on how to navigate her favorite antique poster site by showing him the screen of her laptop! I don’t mind telling you this was exciting.. the mobility kills a laptop, then I vidconfed my partner Craig who shared his daughters latest book reading skills with me for 15 minutes. Words cant describe the world opening up when the power of a PC meets up with the mobility of a phone
In closing this episode, I want to mention the middle ground application mentioned earlier. The obvious need for a UMPC is a palm-like GUI for all the major applications to enable easy use in rushed or minimal focus attention situations (ie when driving, or walking or grabbing some quick notes). The beautiful thing about using XP is that the GUI can be written in anything.. flash or even local web pages… pretty much anyone with moderate computer skills can make there UMPC really fly and have a wonderful customized look. Once I get some of this going Ill drop some screenshots here to give you an idea of the progress.

Ostentatious idea

Browsers were built by a University mentality… where information wants to be free. Everything about the browser is about openness and free gifting of information and technology. Even one of the most powerful web technologies (namely Flash Video e.g. You Tube) is free with no way to make money from it. The only way Adobe makes money is from selling the content generation tools, but hey if your content represents your life’s work then you’re out of luck. To me selling content creation tools without making money on the content is like selling razor handles and giving away the blades!

One day soon the great multitude will wake up to the fact that content is king and that something needs to be done about it. What if… a new breed of browser was born. A browser with a foundation based in fairly priced, easy to use but PAID content… or private content… where who got to see what was not a function of a logon and password and a bunch of SSL servers but rather a monetized environment. Where information, photos, animations movies, music AND applications could all be accessed, used locally and the license for use was maintained ubiquitously, transparently and safely.

Web 2.0 refers to web pages that act like desktop applications.
Enter Web squared (Web2) a new monetized way to look at the web. Trojan and virus free, where monetization of all content is not only integral, but featured.

Welcome to the future.